Autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik. Autism and the Edges of the known World 2019-02-20

Autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik Rating: 5,3/10 1606 reviews

Hubert Peeters

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

According to Delacato, abnormal perceptions might give rise to high levels of anxiety. It may be that a simple difference in timing determines which type of autism develops. The author links in experiences of individuals with autism to reinforce the key points and help make the information more accessible. In doing so she shows that autism can help to illuminate our understanding of what it means to be human, and of how we develop faculties that shape our cognition, language, and behaviour. Our senses are bombarded on a daily basis, and this can render even typical children and adults exhausted by the end of the day.

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楽天ブックス: Autism and the Edges of the Known World: Sensitivities, Language and Constructed Reality

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

About this Item: Pergamon Press, 1987. Repetitive behaviours such as rocking the body, flapping hands and head-banging are seen as an attempt to bring order and predictability to their environment. In this ground-breaking book, Olga Bogdashina examines traditional theories of sensory perception and communication in autism. The difference lies in interpretation and attaching meaning to these experiences. I was looking at my furniture, not as the utilitarian who has to sit on chairs, to write at desks and tables, and not as the cameraman or scientific recorder, but as the pure aesthete whose concern is only with forms and their relationships within the field of vision or the picture of space. She also has a grown-up son with autism.

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Autism and the Edges of the Known World Sensitivities, Language and Constructed Reality « The Asperger’s Society of Ontario

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

The process by which we collect, interpret and comprehend information from the outside world by means of the senses is called perception; it has several stages. The author, who has worked extensively in the field of autism as a teacher, lecturer and researcher, and has an adult son with autism, draws on ideas from a wide range of disciplines, finding, for instance, that explanations for some of the peculiarities of sensory perception in autistic people can be found in works of anthropology and philosophy dating back a century or two. These experiences usually happen when individuals are in a relaxed state and when not much is going on around them. The E-mail message field is required. Even when dealing with complex subject matter, her writing is lucid and engaging. Side-Notes: A Few Questions to Ask 45 4.

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Staff View: Autism and the edges of the known world

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

Required reading for anyone interested in reaching a better understanding of the enigma of autism. I was somewhat amused by how much of her information about autism and sensory percep This was an interesting book. Another example is the development of visually or auditorily impaired children. Similar experiences though rare can be achieved in a relaxed brain state; for example, consider the experience of an American scientist, C. Compared to humans, though, cats have more rods than cones, so they can see in the dark much better than humans. For example, I discovered that explanations of some of the peculiarities of autistic sensory perception and cognition can be found in the philosophical and anthropological work of the last centuries. Her encyclopaedic acquaintance with the subject, both in terms of empirical research and theoretical reflection, is vertiginous in its detail and illuminating in its depth.

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Autism and the edges of the known world : sensitivities, language, and constructed reality

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

Readers looking for answers about autism will find Bogdashina's books fresh and useful; anyone interested in the questions of consciousness and experience will find it riveting. While her writing is lovely and inspiring, it is always based in scientific methodology and reflects her respect for scientific process. She also has a grown-up son with autism. But all at once they appeared to be tremendously alive: without manifesting any exterior motion they seemed to be seething almost joyously inside and gave the distinct impression that in their own degree they were living and actively liking it. Prior to focused attention there is a stage of early processing at a low-level, dealing only with the geometric and photometric properties of the scene. Autism, with its sensory deficits and distortions, provides us with a uniquely valuable prism for rendering the mystery of all 'creaturely knowing' as a subtle dialectic between that which is primordially close and that which sublimely different.

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Autism and the Edges of the known World

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

For example, the unattended aspects of the carpet might still give rise to low-level sensory experience, even if there is a lack of detail. In doing so, she shows that autism can help to illuminate our understanding of what it means to be human, and of how we have developed faculties that have shaped our cognition, language and behaviour. Inhibitory fibres just do not cope with this flow Casanova 2006. It combines scientific research with firsthand testimonials and more philosophical speculations and is written with both academic rigor and literary grace - it's succinct, eloquent, to the point, and both compelling and persuasive. Is it possible that timing determines if impaired development by sensory deprivation may become irreversible? Kaffman and Meaney 2007 suggest that similar effects can be produced by human touching. Examining the 'whys' and 'hows' of the senses, and the role of language, Olga Bogdashina challenges common perceptions of what it means to be 'normal' and 'abnormal'. The book makes use of the personal experiences of autistic people, including Temple Grandin and Donna Williams.

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Hubert Peeters

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

Their own words help illustrate a vibrant world that many non-autistic people are cut off from. This is precisely what Olga Bogdashina attempts to do here. Faced with a bombarding, confusing, baffling and often painful environment, autistic infants withdraw into their own world by shutting down their sensory systems. Since 1994, she has been the director of the first Day Centre for autistic children in Ukraine and the President of the Autism Society, Ukraine. The most common, or at least well-known, form of neurodiversity is autism. This is especially clear in the case of non-verbal individuals. Bogdashina unpacks all our assumptions about the 'real' world.

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Autism and the Edges of the Known World by Theo Peeters · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

autism and the edges of the known world bogdashina olga peeters theo hubert kazik

Linguistics, philosophy, science and health alike blend in a wider survey of how the sense and language interact differently in the autistic individual - and how autism can help foster new concepts of what it means to be human. These children partially recover the ability to understand speech between the ages of two-and-a-half and three. If this is true, what does it tell us about epistemology, about communicating across realities, about reality itself? Huxley was driven to understand the mystery of human consciousness by finding ways to free the mind from the limitations restricting its access to the universe. The key points are about the difficulties individuals have with 'filtering' stimuli, and how this leads to sensory deprivation. The author, who has worked extensively in the field of autism as a teacher, lecturer and researcher, and has an adult son with autism, draws on ideas from a wide range of disciplines, finding, for instance, that explanations for some of the peculiarities of sensory perception in autistic people can be found in works of anthropology and philosophy dating back a century or two. It is to her credit as an academician that she draws upon such varied subjects as philosophy and quantum mechanics to illustrate her thought process and call into question different aspects of our individuality. This distinction explains the subjective difference between merely thinking about an object in front of oneself, and actually seeing it Coates 2003.

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