Building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history. Construction begins on Golden Gate Bridge 2019-02-17

Building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history Rating: 9,8/10 1246 reviews

Building the Golden Gate Bridge : a workers' oral history (Book, 2015) [devopscomplete.com]

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

This is the story of survivors who vividly recall the hardships, hazards, and victories of constructing the landmark span during the Great Depression. Their powerful recollections chronicle the technical details of construction, the grueling physical conditions they endured, the small pleasures they enjoyed, and the gruesome accidents some workers suffered. The result is an evocation of working-class life and culture in a bygone era. These powerful stories are accompanied by stunning photographs of the bridge under construction. Since its opening, an estimated 1,600-2,100 people have jumped to their deaths, said , a local publication. Most of the bridge builders were men of European descent, many of them the sons of immigrants.

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Building the Golden Gate Bridge: A Workers' Oral History (Paperback)

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

Most of the bridge builders were men of European descent, many of them the sons of immigrants. Readers will hear the voices of immigrants, laborers, boxers and cowboys, as well as two of the nurses who cared for them when they were injured. You'll see with new eyes, the magnitude of the project, the uncertain odds of success, and most of all, the sheer danger of working on those towers, cables and scaffolds suspended hundreds of feet above a churning passage to the sea. Eleven workers died during the building of the bridge, 10 of them on one day, February 17, 1937, when their scaffolding fell through a safety net. Whatever your reason for picking up this book, you will be moved while reading.

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Making an Icon: The Stories of the Men Who Built the Golden Gate Bridge

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

An homage to both the American worker and the quintessential San Francisco landmark, Building the Golden Gate Bridge expands our understanding of Depression-era labor and California history and makes a unique contribution to the literature of this iconic span. Harvey Schwartz is curator of the Oral History Collection, International Longshore and Warehouse Union Library, San Francisco. Without any state or federal funding, it would become the first suspension bridge built with a tower in the open ocean, said , a public radio and television station, in a story for the 75 th anniversary. And, when finished, you will see the Gate in a new way. Schwartz also interviewed women: two nurses who cared for the injured and tolerated their antics, the wife of one 1930s builder, and an African American ironworker who toiled on the bridge in later years. Gripping from beginning to end. The book will be of immense value to social historians, labor historians, and California historians and is ideal for use in the classroom.

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Building the Golden Gate Bridge: A Workers' Oral History

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

Their powerful recollections chronicle the technical details of construction, the grueling physical conditions they endured, the small pleasures they enjoyed, and the gruesome accidents some workers suffered. The result is an evocation of working-class life and culture in a bygone era. Additionally, Local 6 built the server racks that power the computer and data systems. Unluckily, he landed in a fallen safety net, which began dragging him down toward the. Relying on their own words, which he recorded years ago, Schwartz takes us deep into the details of the men who built it, and the conditions they worked and died under to complete it. The Commonwealth Club of California is the nation's oldest and largest public affairs forum.

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Construction begins on Golden Gate Bridge

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

At its time, it was also the longest suspension bridge in the world with a length of 4,200 feet. Schwartz has again succeeded in producing a powerful story of work and workers on the Pacific Coast. Labor historian Harvey Schwartz has compiled oral histories of nine workers who helped build the celebrated bridge. The result is an evocation of working-class life and culture in a bygone era. The book will be of immense value to social historians, labor historians, and California historians and is ideal for use in the classroom.

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Building the Golden Gate Bridge: A Workers’ Oral History. By Harvey Schwartz

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

This is the story of survivors who vividly recall the hardships, hazards, and victories of constructing the landmark span during the Great Depression. Yet almost to a person, none of them thought at first that the bridge was anything more than a boondoggle, and assumed it could never actually be built, yet work was work, and badly needed. They are also there in case the power goes out. If you've ever driven across the Golden Gate, or walked across, or merely admired it from a distance or in photos, this book is a must-read. These stories evoke the daily heroic feats of workers in an era when the nation supported infrastructure and jobs projects. Schwartz also interviewed women: two nurses who cared for the injured and tolerated their antics, the wife of one 1930s builder, and an African American ironworker who toiled on the bridge in later years. Moving beyond the familiar accounts of politics and the achievements of celebrity engineers and designers, Building the Golden Gate Bridge is the first book to primarily feature the voices of the workers themselves.

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[FREE] PDF Building the Golden Gate Bridge: A Workers Oral History …

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

These powerful stories are accompanied by stunning photographs of the bridge under construction. These powerful stories are accompanied by stunning photographs of the bridge under construction. Most of the bridge builders were men of European descent, many of them the sons of immigrants. Today, more than 41 million vehicles travel across the bridge each year. The Bay area is home to a number of microclimates that produce notoriously wide variations in temperature, winds and fog.

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Building the Golden Gate Bridge: A Workers’ Oral History. By Harvey Schwartz

building the golden gate bridge a workers oral history

Most of the bridge builders were men of European descent, many of them the sons of immigrants. Nonetheless, roughly a dozen still lost their lives. An homage to both the American worker and the quintessential San Francisco landmark, Building the Golden Gate Bridge expands our understanding of Depression-era labor and California history and makes a unique contribution to the literature of this iconic span. Their powerful recollections chronicle the technical details of construction, the grueling physical conditions they endured, the small pleasures they enjoyed, and the gruesome accidents some workers suffered. Their powerful recollections chronicle the technical details of construction, the grueling physical conditions they endured, the small pleasures they enjoyed, and the gruesome accidents some workers suffered.

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