Dear appalachia satterwhite emily. Dear Appalachia : readers, identity, and popular fiction since 1878 (eBook, 2011) [devopscomplete.com] 2019-02-11

Dear appalachia satterwhite emily Rating: 8,6/10 109 reviews

Chatting with Scholar, Author Emily Satterwhite

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

Weatherford Award for best non-fiction book of 2011, Appalachian Studies Association and Berea College Loyal Jones Appalachian Center Certificate of Teaching Excellence, College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences, Virginia Tech, 2012. Fan mail for both books confirms that readers saw Appalachia as a distinctive world apart. According to Satterwhite, best-selling fiction has portrayed Appalachia as a distinctive place apart from the mainstream United States, has offered cosmopolitan white readers a sense of identity and community, and has engendered feelings of national and cultural pride. Two of the major ones for me were 1 insiders versus outsiders and 2 race and the idea of Appalachia as a white utopia. Satterwhite, also a teacher of American studies and popular culture at Virginia Tech, discovers how readers have imagined the region and what purposes these imagined geographies have served for them.

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Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878: Emily Satterwhite: 9780813161105: devopscomplete.com: Books

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

Thanks in part to readers' faith in authors as authentic representatives of the regions they write about, Satterwhite argues, regional fiction often plays a role in creating and affirming regional identity. For it can be a means of reassuring ourselves of our sanity as creatures, a part of the geography of hope. It should be mentioned that many nationalities who came in to work in coal, lumber, and railroads were rarely mentioned in the novels, much less the letters: Italians, Polish, African Americans, and many more. These two pop culture touchstones, as different as two novels can be, still continue to shape national perceptions of the Appalachian region. Satterwhite's unique approach doesn't just explain how people view Appalachia, it explains why they think that way. Do you think that need is born out of homesickness? Based primarily on a careful reading of fan mail and an impressive grasp of the scholarly literature, Dear Appalachia provides critical and fresh perspective on the politics of American identity.

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Dear Appalachia: Appalachian Readings

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

Books, on the other hand, often draw enthusiastic praise for their celebration of the simplicity and authenticity of the Appalachian region. These readers wanted the production of region as authentic, the construction of identity and belonging by way of geographical affiliations, and the circulation of power. Moving beyond traditional examinations of regional fiction, Dear Appalachia is an innovative study that reveals how narratives function in the lives of readers. Satterwhite received the Weatherford Award March 23rd at the Appalachian Studies Conference hosted by Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Many people who have never set foot in Appalachia have very definite ideas about what the region is like. According to Satterwhite, best-selling fiction has portrayed Appalachia as a distinctive place apart from the mainstream United States, has offered cosmopolitan white readers a sense of identity and community, and has engendered feelings of national and cultural pride. Investigating texts such as John Fox Jr.

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Braver Self: Dear Appalachia

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878 employs the innovative strategy of examining fan mail, reviews, and readers' geographic affiliations to understand how readers have imagined the region and what purposes these imagined geographies have served for them. Emily Satterwhite warns in her concluding chapter of some unintended consequences of the imaginary versions of Appalachia created by readers, such as the potential to reinforce white nationalism or endorse problematic images of so-called primitives around the world. The novels provide mountaineers who relate a supposed colorful collective past for white culture through preservation of folklore and music. Many readers actually visited the region as tourists, trying to find the real places that the fictionalized towns were based on, and were disappointed that they were not as imagined. Coal camps, in reality, were melting pots of culture.

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Dear Appalachia : readers, identity, and popular fiction since 1878 (eBook, 2011) [devopscomplete.com]

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

Could the beauty of the landscape and the proximity to family cancel out the lack of jobs and the tension of prolific political views antithetical to my own? This award is given for the best nonfiction book in Appalachian studies published each year. But people who may have moved from the region, or with parents and grandparents who were raised in the region, may feel like they were robbed of sense of place and sense of community. Satterwhite's scrupulous analysis of those readers' reactions offers provocative insights into the identity dynamics of white Americans. We idealize what we had. She finds that nationally identified readers turned to Fox's work as an anti-modernist tonic. Is it possible to read Appalachian literature, enjoy it, and not be guilty of identity seeking? While Christy's 1912 pastoral setting provides a quiet place of God-fearing self-reliance, Deliverance readers sought titillation and reassurance that Appalachia permits the primitive to endure in the modern world.

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Dear Appalachia

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

Whether these assumptions originate with movies like Deliverance 1972 and Coal Miner's Daughter 1980 , from Robert F. Continuing my 2018 resolution to read more books about Appalachia, I chose Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878 by Emily Satterwhite for February. No other region in America is so fraught with projected meaning as Appalachia. According to Satterwhite, best-selling fiction has portrayed Appalachia as a distinctive place apart from the mainstream United States, has offered cosmopolitan white readers a sense of identity and community, and has engendered feelings of national and cultural pride. Moody, Emily Satterwhite, and Warren K. All content appearing on The HillVille is property of the publication's publishers and may only be reprinted with permission. No other region in America is so fraught with projected meaning as Appalachia.

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Dear Appalachia: Appalachian Readings

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

Kennedy's widely publicized Appalachian Tour, or from tales of hiking the Appalachian Trail, chances are these suppositions serve a purpose to the person who holds them. As Emily Satterwhite traces the changing visions of Appalachia across the decades, from the Gilded Age 1865--1895 to the present, she finds that every generation has produced an audience hungry for a romantic version of Appalachia. A prevailing view of The Trail of the Lonesome Pine is that it promotes imperialism by painting moonshiners as inferior but redeemable. Would you describe your book as a cautionary tale? I would describe the book as a cautionary tale. In particular, she looks at how At Home in Mitford, Big Stone Gap, Clay's Quilt, and Cold Mountain meet reader needs for authentic place, community, belonging and identity. Based primarily on a careful reading of fan mail and an impressive grasp of the scholarly literature, Dear Appalachia provides critical and fresh perspective on the politics of American identity.

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Emily M Satterwhite

dear appalachia satterwhite emily

The books seems to celebrate mountain quaintness for these readers while nationalizing industrial intervention. According to Satterwhite, best-selling fiction has portrayed Appalachia as a distinctive place apart from the mainstream United States, has offered cosmopolitan white readers a sense of identity and community, and has engendered feelings of national and cultural pride. But it is also rural and cannot easily sustain my goals. What I found is that best-selling fiction often celebrates the region, but in doing so, often makes positive generalizations. Published in November 2011 by University Press of Kentucky, Dear Appalachia uses an innovative research method--that of sifting through fan mail and reviews to better understand the relationship between reader and text.

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